Proposed Greening of the CAP: only small gains

PBL has published a brief analysis of the European Commission’s proposals for the Common Agricultural Policy called 'Greening the CAP: An analysis of the effects of the European Commission’s proposals for the Common Agricultural Policy 2014–2020'.

The impact of the proposed greening measures of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on the sustainable development of agriculture appears to be relatively small. Member States must assign 30 percent of their Pillar I budget to these measures, a total annual amount of 13 billion euros. Greening measures could be made more effective by tailoring the proposed ecological focus areas to local conditions and by promoting the formation of a green infrastructure.

Furthermore, the attribution of 5 percent to 10 percent of the total CAP budget to stimulating more sustainable animal husbandry systems may solve persistent issues in the intensive livestock production regarding environmental quality, and animal health and welfare. These are the main conclusions of the report by PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, ´Greening the CAP: An analysis of the effects of the European Commission’s proposals for the Common Agricultural Policy 2014–2020´.

1 comment posted

  • roeland de kok March 26th, 2012

    on; PBL note greening the CAP

    topic 2.2 crop diversification. mono-culture of maize related to bio-gas production.

    In German states of NR-Westfalia and Sch.-Holstein there is about 13 to 20% maize. In Drenthe, Braband and Gelderland such percentages are similar. It would be simple to produce the cropmap for maize per year. After 8 years of Maize, such parcels are not likely to support commercially any other croptype. To reduce maize production in a province like Drenthe might in total hectares have a very considerable impact more than the 2% EU wide suggests. Crop rotation would then remove 1/3rd-1/4th of the Maize area now in production every year (in rotation). That could be up to 5% of the total arable land in that province. You can imagine what it would mean to the bee-population (apis) if the amount of Lupine or Faecelia would increase with 5% of total arable land in such a province.

PUBLICATION DATE

22 Feb 2012

AUTHOR

Henk Westhoek

FURTHER INFORMATION

Henk Westhoek (1959) is since 2001 the program manager for Agriculture and Food of the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL). He is also co-chair of the TFRN Expert Panel on Nitrogen and Food.